The Roman Water System: its contribution to the succes and failure of ancient Rome.

The plates of the thesis of Greg Tardieu (1986)


All photo's on this page Greg Tardieu

I Cloaca Maxima Cloaca Maxima.This is the mouth of the Cloaca Maxima as seen today
IIa+b Aqua Virgo Aqua Virgo. This is an arch from the Aqua Virgo located at 14 via Nazzareno in Rome. According to its inscription, it was restored by Claudius after its destruction by Caligula. Note: the blurs in the plates are due to the chain link fence that surrounds this arch. Aqua Virgo. This is an arch from the Aqua Virgo located at 14 via Nazzareno in Rome. According to its inscription, it was restored by Claudius after its destruction by Caligula. Note: the blurs in the plates are due to the chain link fence that surrounds this arch.
IIIa+b Aqua Claudia
and Novus
Aqua Claudia and Novus. Claudia with Aqua Novus riding on top. Aqua Claudia and Novus. Close up. On top the Aqua Novus of bricks and concrete; the lower part indicates Aqua Claudia of cut stones.
IV Mineral deposits Mineral deposits. This lead pipe represents damage caused by mineral deposits. Left unchecked the deposits would choke the pipe.
Va+b Lead pipes Lead pipes. The two longer pipes in this plate are about twelve feet long. Lead pipes. This is a close up of the middle pipe of plate Va. This inscription dates the pipe to the reign of Marcus Aurelius.
VIa+b Clay pipes Clay pipes. This plate shows three clay pipes tapped into Aqua Claudia. These sets of arches are located near the Porta Maggiore. Clay pipes. This is a longer view pf plate VIa. Lower right corner shows the three clay pipes emerging from the concrete.
VIIa+b Stone pipe Stone pipe. This is the female end of the stone pipe. It appears to have been cut for a drain cover like that of plate VIII Stone pipe. This is the male end of the same stone pipe.
VIII Bocca della verita Bocca della Vertita. Better known as the mouth of truth, is in fact an ancient drain cover.
IXa+b Damage caused by plants Damage caused by plants. Aquae Felice seen with plants growing into it. Notice the pine tree growing on top. Damage caused by plants. Looking in the opposite direction of plate Xa; plants can be seen growing into the side of the channel.
Xa+b Mineral deposits indicate leakage Mineral deposits indicate leakage. View of the interior of the arches of Aquae Felice show signs of leakage of water from the modern day aqueduct. Mineral deposits indicate leakage. This is a close up of mineral deposits from the Neronian arches on the Caelian hill.
XIa+b Patched arches Patched arches. This arch )* had been completely filled in with concrete faced with bricks. It was poorly done as the plate shows. Patched arches. This is another example of an arch )* that required extensive repairs. Note: the arch to the left had been only partially filled in.
XIc Patched arches Patched arches. This archof Aqua Marcia has been progressively repaired. Note how the quality of masonry declined from the original cut stone to concrete faced with bricks. Under this is further repair with concrete mixed with stone. This arch is located immediate south of Porta Tiburtine near the train station in Rome.
XIIa+b Reinforced arches Reinforced arches. Note the fifth and sixth arches from the right. They have been reinforced with concrete and brick. The reinforcement had been built-up, much like a buttress, to stabilize lateral movement by the aqueduct. Reinforced arches. Close up of plate XIIa.
XIIc Reinforced arches Reinforced arches. The two arches on the left are both remains of repair made to Aqua Claudia. The original stone structure is all but gone. These are both excellent examples of the amount of materials used for each arch. These two arches are only partial repairs, compared to others that were made.
XIII Porta Maggiore Porta Maggiore. The inscriptions on this double arch are used to date the repairs made to Aqua Claudia and Aqua Novus. Porta Maggiore. This plate is looking just to the right of plate XIIIa. Left on top: Aqua Novus; just below it: Aqua Claudia. On the right on top: Aqua Julie, below it: Aqua Tepula, below the Tepula: Aqua Marcia.

)* Plates XIa en XIb are courtesy of the British consulate in Rome. These arches are located on the private grounds of Villa Wolkonsky, the recidence of the British Ambassador.

HOME More literature on more aqueducts Last modified: January, 2006 - Wilke D. Schram (wilke@cs.uu.nl)